Los Abismos de Pasion: Love, Revenge, and Vampirism?

        As obscure as it may sound, Luis Bunuel's 1954 film, Los Abismos de Pasion, a Mexican version of Emily Brontë's 1847 book, Wuthering Heights, does have some hints of Vampirism within the story. This reminds me of Count Dracula's ability to control people's minds and force them to do as he wished.

        The most obvious example of this is that every time Alejandro, played by Jorge Mistral, would kiss Isabel , depicted by Lilia Prado, he would do it on the neck instead of on the face. Not only does this demonstrate Vampirism, especially as practiced by Count Dracula, but her reaction to it also played the part. You see, every time Alejandro would kiss her, she would resist it less and less until she had stopped resisting it all together.

        Of course, Isabella was not the only one who was drawn by Alejandro's "vampire-like behavior." Catalina, portrayed by Iraseme Dillian, was also drawn into Alejandro's spell and was, in a manner, taken by him from her family, especially her husband, Eugardo (Ernesto Alonzo), by him. I think that this idea is shown throughout the movie because she, like the victims of Count Dracula, was very vocal about her feelings toward Alejandro and had no regrets about it. This reminds me of Count Dracula's ability to control people's minds and force them to do as he wished.

        I am not saying that this version of Wuthering Heights is supposed to only emphasize the ways of Vampirism. However, I think that it paints an accurate portrait of Alejandro, a latter-day Count Dracula, a man who comes and drains all the happiness from the people at the house and leaves them with nothing but the cold feeling of death. That, I believe, is the main reason for this inclusion.

Matthew Engle

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