Good Morning Vietnam: A Satirical Comedy

         Good Morning Vietnam (1987), directed by Barry Levinson, is a satirical comedy set during the Vietnam War period. Robin Williams plays Adrian Cronauer, a radio jockey, in Vietnam. His unconventional personality causes the radio station to rethink their approach to communications in Vietnam.

         There are many humorous lines in the movie that support how comedy can be used to allow the audience to escape from serious topics, such as war. In one of Cronauer’s broadcasts, he says, “And now, here are the headlines. Here they come right now. Pope actually found to be Jewish. Liberace is Anastasia, and Ethel Merman jams Russian radar. The East Germans, today, claimed the Berlin Wall was a fraternity prank. Also, the Pope decided today to release Vatican-related bath products. An incredible thing, yes, it's the new Pope on a Rope. That's right. Pope on a Rope. Wash with it, go straight to heaven,” according to the Humorsphere.com Web Site.

         These ironical statements brought humor in what could have been a very serious video about war. Charlie Chapman was infamous for his physical reactions that caused the audience to laugh. Instead, Williams uses his own improvisational style and blunt language to bring the film into a classic.

         Williams also uses colorful clothing to demonstrate his personality within the movie. While officers and soldiers are in full uniform, William’s chooses not only to express himself with his language but also with his visual appearance. Soldiers in the movie are able to relate to his character because of his humor. However, in the end, Williams is fired because his style of broadcast offends the officer’s code of conduct.

         However, movie watchers, especially those who do not like war films, are able to watch the movie and enjoy Williams’ portrayal. Even though Williams is not the only who invented the concept of comedy, he has continued to take it to the next level and push the boundaries.

Rockelle Gray

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