The Film Studies Minor at Murray State:

Catalog Descriptions with Amplifications when Necessary

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Film Studies Minor--21 Hours

Both of the following two:

ENG 313 History of the Cinema--3 Hours
This course will cover the international, historical, cultural, artistic, and technical development of the cinema from the beginning to the present, with some emphasis on American contributions.
ENG 314 Shakespeare in Film--3 Hours
A study of filmed versions of Shakespeare’s comedies, Histories, and Tragedies. Prerequisites: ENG 105 or 150. 1 Hour of Lecture. 2 Hours of Lab per week.

One of the following five:

ENG 315 Global Cinema--3 Hours
A study of national cinema and industries outside the United States, examining significant directors and film movements. This class meets for two hours for lectures and discussion and two hours for film viewing. Prerequisites: ENG 104, or ENG 105, or the equivalent.

ENG/FRE/GER/SPA 419 European Cinema--3 Hours
This course combines ENG, FRE, GER, and SPA 419, described in more detail below.
The films are shown on Monday nights. The Tuesday class is a large discussion class in English. The Thursday class consists of small, language-specific sections that deal in that language with a scene or some other component of the film in question. Students will view approximately thirteen films for class and will read critical essays about the way European cinema has portrayed changes in European society. Selected films will be organized around social themes, which will then be viewed from different national perspectives. The format of the course will be interactive, with students frequently being designated to present individual or group exposés in class on specific directors or on cultural/historical topics pertaining to particular films.

ENG 419 European Cinema--3 Hours
A survey of European (including British) film by French, German, and Spanish directors in the original languages with English subtitles except for the English-language films. Selected films will be organized around social themes, which will then be viewed from different national perspectives. The common discussion section on one day will be conducted in English to be accessible to students of all languages; the second discussion section will be conducted in English. Students are required to attend film viewings in a separate lab section. Students may receive credit for only one of FRE 419, GER 419, SPA 419 or ENG 419. Prerequisite: ENG 204 or ENG 205 or consent of instructor.

FRE 419 European Cinema--3 Hours
A survey of European (including British) film by French, German, and Spanish directors in the original languages with English subtitles except for the English-language films. Selected films will be organized around social themes, which will then be viewed from different national perspectives. The common discussion section on one day will be conducted in English to be accessible to students of all languages; the second discussion section will be conducted in French. Students are required to attend film viewings in a separate lab section. Students may receive credit for only one of FRE 419, GER 419, SPA 419 or ENG 419. Prerequisite: FRE 301 or FRE 301 or consent of the instructor.

GER 419 European Cinema--3 Hours
A survey of European (including British) film by French, German, and Spanish directors in the original languages with English subtitles except for the English-language films. Selected films will be organized around social themes, which will then be viewed from different national perspectives. The common discussion section on one day will be conducted in English to be accessible to students of all languages; the second discussion section will be conducted in German. Students are required to attend film viewings in a separate lab section. Students may receive credit for only one of FRE 419, GER 419, SPA 419 or ENG 419. Prerequisite: GER 301 or 331 or consent of the instructor.

SPA 419 European Cinema--3 Hours
A survey of European (including British) film by French, German, and Spanish directors in the original languages with English subtitles except for the English-language films. Selected films will be organized around social themes, which will then be viewed from different national perspectives. The common discussion section on one day will be conducted in English to be accessible to students of all languages; the second discussion section will be conducted in Spanish. Students are required to attend film viewings in a separate lab section. Students may receive credit for only one of FRE 419, GER 419, SPA 419 or ENG 419. Prerequisite: SPA 301 or consent of the instructor.

One or two of the following:

ART 382 Introduction to Photography I--3 Hours
Includes various photographic processes, cameras (structures, use, operation), films (types, use and development) and print development (darkroom techniques). Both technical and compositional aspects are stressed. Discussion and criticism. Cameras are not supplied. Six hours per week.

ART 383 Photography II--3 Hours
Continuation and refinement of technical aspects presented in ART 382 with expanded emphasis on individual investigation. Discussion and criticism. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 382 or consent of the instructor.

ART 384 Photography III--3 Hours
Exploration of personal style and various photographic processes. Discussion and investigation of historical and current photographic concerns and trends. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 383 or consent of the instructor.

ART 385 Introduction to Cinematography--3 Hours
Techniques and criticism of motion pictures. Camera are not supplied.

JMC 270 Basic Audio/Video Productions--3 Hours
Introduction to productive technology including audio control operations, audio and video recording, camera operations and editing. Prerequisites: JMC 168 and ENG 104 or ENG 105 with a grade of C or better.

JMC 336 Script Writing--3 Hours
Theory and practice of writing for radio and television. Includes dramatic scripts; radio and TV copy conventions; script outlines and documentaries. Students taking this course to fulfill a requirement of the Film Studies Minor should negotiate with the instructor about film-specific assignments. Prerequisite: JMC 168

ENG 343 Special Topics in Creative Writing--3 Hours
A study of a special area of creative writing. Content will vary from semester according to student and faculty interest. The course will combine the careful reading of works by established writers with analysis of original student work. Students will be required to attend readings on campus and in the area. Course may be repeated for credit three times with the consent of the instructor and student's advisor. Students taking this course to fulfill a requirement of the Film Studies Minor should negotiate with the instructor about film-specific assignments. Prerequisites: ENG ENG 104, or ENG 105, or the equivalent

ENG 460 Comedy and Satire--3 Hours
This course will study the historical development of comedy and/or satire as a literary genre and as a cultural manifestation (e.g., plays, novels, essays, movies, comedians, etc.). It may also focus on theories of comedy and satire. Students taking this course to fulfill a requirement of the Film Studies Minor should negotiate with the instructor about film-specific assignments. ENG 104, or ENG 105, or the equivalent, and at least one upper-level literature course.

Two or three of the following:

ART 490 Special Problems in Studio Art--3 Hours
An independent problems course in studio art for advanced undergraduates majoring in art under the direction of a faculty member. The student must submit and receive approval of a detailed study plan prior to registration. May be repeated up to three times for credit. Students taking this course to fulfill a requirement of the Film Studies Minor should negotiate with the instructor about film-specific assignments. Prerequisites: consent of the department chair.

ENG 213 The Film and Literature--3 Hours
A study of the correlations between the film form and traditional literary forms. Prerequisites: ENG 104, or ENG 105, or the equivalent

ENG 417 Film in the Classroom.--3 Hours
Film studies course introducing educators and future educators to methods of effectively incorporating films into classroom curricula. This class meets for two hours for lecture and discussion and two hours for film viewing. Prerequisites: ENG 104, or ENG 105, or the equivalent).

ENG 351 Special Topics in Film Studies--3 Hours
The study of an advanced area of film studies, including, but not limited to studies in major film makers, national trends, genres, schools of theory, or influential actors. The course may be repeated twice with the consent of the Chair.

ENG 417 Film in the Classroom.--3 Hours
Film studies course introducing educators and future educators to methods of effectively incorporating films into classroom curricula. This class meets for two hours for lecture and discussion and two hours for film viewing. Prerequisites: ENG 104, or ENG 105, or the equivalent).

HIS 477 Hollywood History--3 Hours
A critical, analytical examination of all the past in films and how movies shape popular perceptions of history.

JMC 358 Television Studio Production--3 Hours
Television studio production technology including camera operations, recording, audio and video control, video switching, electronic graphics, lighting, staging, and production organization, with an emphasis on broadcast-quality results. Prerequisites: ENG 104 or ENG 105, JMC 168, 270, 336, or consent of the instructor.

MUS 106 Music in Film--3 Hours
Courses will present a survey of the history of film music from the silent era to the present. Students will develop critical listening, viewing, and analytical skill in relation to music's function in film. For the viewing of complete films, extra meetings may be held on campus. Students will be expected to view current release films in a local theater.

MUS 313 Introduction to Music Synthesis--1 Hour
The current course is worth only one credit and should be repeated by Film Studies Minors 3 times to fulfill a 3-hour requirement. This course emphasizes a study of the concepts and selected applications of computer music in a digital studio. Course content includes computer techniques, music sequencing, sound design, sound sampling, and the use of MIDI. One or more original compositions using the technology will be performed during the semester. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.
In the past, students who have not declared music as a major enroll in the course. Some of those students have been interested in writing music for film. A couple of past students have attempted to synchronize music to small video projects they have worked on (or that friends have worked on). Physical space is extremely limited–the room will only accept a maximum of 10 students per term (6 to 8 is preferred). Students are required to produce a recital at the end of each semester (Electro-Acoustic Recital Series- E.A.R.S.), which has historically been extremely varied in content. The course may be repeated for credit as needed. Students earning a Film Studies Minor would be encouraged to work toward a project that would include synchronizing music to video thereby providing a practical hands-on approach to understanding the technology involved. Prerequisites: MUS110 and 112 or consent of the professor.

May only include one of the following.

ENG 341 Introduction to Writing Fiction--3 Hours
An introduction to writing fiction, combining the careful reading of works by established writers with analysis of original student stories.
Students taking this course to fulfill a requirement of the Film Studies Minor should negotiate with the instructor about film-specific assignments. Prerequisites: None

ENG 342 Introduction to Writing Poetry--3 Hours
An introduction to writing poetry, combining the careful reading of poems by established writers with analysis of original student poems.
Many independent, foreign, and especially non-narrative films are imagistic in structure. Therefore, writing poems will help Film Minor students understand how film makers can create screenplays, craft storyboards, use cameras, and design sound effects to achieve psychological depth through the use of images as metaphors, leitmotifs, fusing images into montages, juxtaposing images for maximum effect. Prerequisites: None

ENG 415 Writer's Workshop: Fiction--3 Hours
An intensive study of the techniques of writing the short story with special concentration on the student's own work. Students taking this course to fulfill a requirement of the Film Studies Minor should negotiate with the instructor about film-specific assignments. Prerequisites: ENG 214 or 341 or consent of the instructor.

ENG 416 Writer's Workshop: Poetry--3 Hours
An intensive study of the techniques of writing poetry, with special concentration on the student’s own work.
Many independent, foreign, and especially non-narrative films are imagistic in structure. Therefore, writing poems will help Film Minor students understand how film makers can create screenplays, craft storyboards, use cameras, and design sound effects to achieve psychological depth through the use of images as metaphors, leitmotifs, fusing images into montages, juxtaposing images for maximum effect. Prerequisites: ENG 214 or 342 or consent of the instructor.

Students may select an optional course substitution, such as the one cited below, with the consent of the Chair of the Film Studies Minor and the instructor.

CSC 275 Graphical Rendering--3 Hours
In this course we cover the basic methods of computer-based three-dimensional layout and design, composition, and perspective. We review the effects of applying predefined surface textures to object models as well as the techniques for creating user-defined textures. We employ methods of abstraction provided by the software tools to permit the creation and manipulation of hierarchically defined objects. Finally we review the effects of camera modeling and the importance of point of view on the appearance of computer generated scenes.
This is a hands-on laboratory course for anyone interested in learning the basic techniques of photo-realistic image rendering using a computer. No previous programming experience or mathematical background is required. In its current form, this course uses POV-Ray, a raytracing tool capable of creating realistic and/or fantastic three-dimensional graphics. This software tool is completely free and available for most computers and operating systems, including Windows, Mac/OS and GNU/Linux. You can read more about POV-Ray and download an installer at www.povray.org.

How to apply and more
http://www.murraystate.edu

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